“Told with exuberance and honesty, First Comes Marriage is a charming, delightful memoir of love and self-discovery. Huda Al-Marashi has written a smart, down-to-earth, and unforgettable modern-day love story that celebrates the enduring bonds of culture, faith, and family. A wonderful book.”

—Jasmin Darznik, New York Times–bestselling author of The Good Daughter and Song of a Captive Bird

First Comes Marriage is an honest, often amusing, account of one young woman’s quest to balance the traditional Muslim values she acquired from her Iraqi immigrant parents with the romantic fantasies she acquired from American media. Her story is both unique in that the devout, overachieving narrator is not the rebellious first-generation daughter we’ve come to expect from immigrant narratives, and universal in its instructive journey from youthful hubris and naïveté to learning how to make a marriage work.”

—Faith Adiele, author of The Nigerian Nordic Girl’s Guide to Lady Problems, and founder of VONA Travel Workshop for Writers of Color

“Determined to weave her own love story from the threads of the two seemingly opposing cultures she grew up in, Al-Marashi fearlessly takes us on a journey into the darkest corners of her young marriage, as well as herself.”

—Jen Waite, internationally bestselling author of A Beautiful, Terrible Thing 

"Whether to have an arranged marriage or an American love story forms the core of “First Comes Marriage,” her charming, funny, heartbreaking memoir of faith, family and the journey to love. If Jane Austen had grown up as a first-gen daughter of Iraqi parents in the 1990s, she might have written this. Keenly observed, with indelible characters, al-Marashi portrays the complex mores and manners that govern life and love in the immigrant community of her youth."

Washington Post

“There comes a time in every relationship (romantic or platonic) when one must decide to leave or stay. With courage, humor, and vulnerability, skilled memoirist Huda Al-Marashi excavates the contours of her marriage, intimately sharing with the reader the journey to her moment of choice.”

—Ayesha Mattu, coeditor of Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women and Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex, and Intimacy

“This sweet, sharply insightful memoir of an Iraqi American marriage skewers stereotypes as it leaves you cheering for these newlyweds.”

—Susan Muaddi Darraj, author of A Curious Land

"Whether to have an arranged marriage or an American love story forms the core of “First Comes Marriage,” her charming, funny, heartbreaking memoir of faith, family and the journey to love. If Jane Austen had grown up as a first-gen daughter of Iraqi parents in the 1990s, she might have written this. Keenly observed, with indelible characters, al-Marashi portrays the complex mores and manners that govern life and love in the immigrant community of her youth."

Washington Post

“There comes a time in every relationship (romantic or platonic) when one must decide to leave or stay. With courage, humor, and vulnerability, skilled memoirist Huda Al-Marashi excavates the contours of her marriage, intimately sharing with the reader the journey to her moment of choice.”

—Ayesha Mattu, coeditor of Love, InshAllah: The Secret Love Lives of American Muslim Women and Salaam, Love: American Muslim Men on Love, Sex, and Intimacy

“This sweet, sharply insightful memoir of an Iraqi American marriage skewers stereotypes as it leaves you cheering for these newlyweds.”

—Susan Muaddi Darraj, author of A Curious Land

“Told with exuberance and honesty, First Comes Marriage is a charming, delightful memoir of love and self-discovery. Huda Al-Marashi has written a smart, down-to-earth, and unforgettable modern-day love story that celebrates the enduring bonds of culture, faith, and family. A wonderful book.”

—Jasmin Darznik, New York Times–bestselling author of The Good Daughter and Song of a Captive Bird

First Comes Marriage is an honest, often amusing, account of one young woman’s quest to balance the traditional Muslim values she acquired from her Iraqi immigrant parents with the romantic fantasies she acquired from American media. Her story is both unique in that the devout, overachieving narrator is not the rebellious first-generation daughter we’ve come to expect from immigrant narratives, and universal in its instructive journey from youthful hubris and naïveté to learning how to make a marriage work.”

—Faith Adiele, author of The Nigerian Nordic Girl’s Guide to Lady Problems, and founder of VONA Travel Workshop for Writers of Color

“Determined to weave her own love story from the threads of the two seemingly opposing cultures she grew up in, Al-Marashi fearlessly takes us on a journey into the darkest corners of her young marriage, as well as herself.”

—Jen Waite, internationally bestselling author of A Beautiful, Terrible Thing